Dyson Upright Vacuum Cleaner, Ball Multi Floor 2 Review

We took the Dyson Multi Floor 2 upright vacuum and put it through a lot of tests. We found that it was a great vacuum for some tasks, but in general, it was really disappointing. The Dyson Multi Floor 2 is very similar to the Dyson Ball Animal 2 except that it’s smaller, lighter, and less expensive than the Ball Animal 2. And although Dyson specs say it’s less powerful than the Ball Animal 2, our tests actually showed it was more powerful.

Dyson Upright Vacuum Cleaner

For example, with the suction tests, where we were amazed to see it measure 114 inches of water lift, which is higher than any bagless vacuum I’ve ever tested, beating out the previous king, the Shark APEX Zero M, which we measured at 101 inches of water, and the Dyson Ball Animal 2 at 97.

But airflow is a more important metric for predicting vacuums’ cleaning ability and here it was just a little above average, scoring 80 CFM at the wand and 59 CFM at the cleaner head, which is still more than our Dyson Ball Animal 2 results. And I have no idea why it consistently beat the supposedly more powerful Ball Animal 2 with the power test. I would be very interested to see if other vacuum reviewers have noticed this or if I have a faulty Ball Animal 2.

So before we get to all the negative stuff, let’s give credit where credit is due and look at the pros first. The Multi Floor 2 has some cool features, like the very easy to remove wand for picking up larger debris and cleaning up high. The hoses on the Dyson uprights are very well built and extremely long. And yes, when the vacuum is turned on, it doesn’t stretch quite as far, but it’s still a much better reach than your average vacuum.

Dyson Upright Vacuum Cleaner Review

The Multi Floor 2, at 15.5 pounds, is lighter and more compact than the Ball Animal 2 at 17 pounds. It doesn’t seem like much but it felt like a big difference to me. But probably the best feature of the Dyson Multi Floor 2 is the very strong agitation which, with the big brush roll motor and stiff bristles combined with the active baseplate, which automatically adjusts to your floor type to get the best possible seal on the floor, the net result of those features is that it’s just about an unparalleled deep cleaner for carpets.

In our carpet deep clean test, the Multi Floor 2 was the only upright vacuum to score a perfect 100 which was also the case when we previously tested the Dyson Ball Animal 2. The active baseplate also creates a great airflow seal on hard floors, as seen in the crevice pick up test where it gets debris out of both crevice sizes fairly quickly. I would say better than 90% of other premium vacuums.

Time to move on to the negative things. And you Dyson fans should know that I’m also a Dyson fan. The Dyson V10 is one our best cordless vacuum tests and it’s far and away our favorite cordless vacuum. I’m just not a fan of these newer ball uprights from Dyson.

The first major problem is that it’s incapable of cleaning carpets even a little higher than a low pile carpet. This is for a combination of reasons. First, because the height is not adjustable and the motor bogs down and the brush roll stops spinning. In fact, with the deep clean test I mentioned earlier, on what I would consider just medium pile carpet, we had to restart the brush roll motor several times just to complete the job. But even if the brush roll motor didn’t quit, it has no adjustable suction and so you can barely move the vacuum on thicker carpets. And I’m a pretty big guy and there’s no way I could clean a house with this vacuum if the carpet was even moderately thick.

Ball Multi Floor 2 Review

So the next problem is the active base plate and the cleaner head design. For some reason, the American version of these vacuums don’t have an adjustable gate on the front, like the UK counterparts do for larger debris. And with no way to adjust the height, the Multi Floor 2 doesn’t do good with larger debris on hard floors at all. It even has trouble with just pet hair. To be fair, it’s marginally better than the Ball Animal 2, which was very nearly useless on hard floors. And yes, you have the wand for larger debris, but you should plan on using the wand a lot if you have hard floors as it just doesn’t do that well.

Another issue is with its filtration. The Dyson Ball Animal 2 and the Multi Floor 2 are supposed to be sealed systems, what Dyson calls whole machine HEPA filtration, but our test suggests that they are not. Now, the tests I do is not laboratory quality by any means and shouldn’t be considered authoritative in any way, but I have found that it does reliably find leaks in vacuum systems.

And in this test’s defense, with every other vacuum I’ve tested, and that’s quite a few at this point, the results have been what they were supposed to be, meaning vacuums that claim to have sealed systems with HEPA filters don’t show any fog. And those that don’t have sealed systems show fog, except, that is, with the Dyson ball uprights.

Dyson Ball Multi Floor 2

The Dyson Ball Animal 2 leaked very badly and now we find that the Multi Floor 2 also leaks. So again, these tests shouldn’t be taken too seriously but I would like to see other people who have better testing equipment see if they can find similar results on lightly used or even new Dyson ball vacuums.

So with all that said, the bottom line is that the Dyson Multi Floor 2 is an excellent vacuum for one specific purpose, that is deep cleaning low pile carpets. But in my opinion, it has some fundamental design flaws and should be avoided if you have a lot of hard floors, anything but very low pile carpet, or if you have allergies or asthma.

2018-12-02T20:21:06+00:00